Adult site trade video picture

The ticket prices will not be similar between airliners and starships because FTL interstellar travel will probably take more than a few hours for the trip.Therefore the starships will do fewer trips per year than airliners, so the starship passenger ticket price (and cargo waybill) will have to cover a larger share of the starship's yearly expense.

A cargo jet can carry 50 tons so its purchase price is about million per ton of cargo capacity.

Written with help from a real live economist, this allows one to model interplanetary and interstellar trade with equations and everything.

It has detailed analysis of the economics of interstellar trade, and a system of equations to model trade routes and economic demands.

In the fatigue and cynicism of the Civil War's aftermath, Reconstructionism becomes a promise unfulfilled. Professor Miller and his team of historians examine where America is in 1876 and discuss the question of race. Professor Miller continues the story of the American Industrial Revolution in New York and Chicago, looking at the lives of Andrew Carnegie, Gustavus Swift, and the countless workers in the packinghouse and on the factory floor. Chicago -- with Hull House, the World's Columbian Exposition, the new female workforce, the skyscraper, the department store, and unfettered capitalism -- is the place to watch a new world in the making at the turn of the century. Railroads and ranchers, rabble-rousers and racists populate America's distant frontiers, and Native Americans are displaced from their homelands. Capital and Labor The making of money pits laborers against the forces of capital as the twentieth century opens. Professor Miller discusses American socialism, Eugene Debs, international communism, and the roots of the Cold War with Professor Brinkley. In a discussion with Professors Scharff and Miller, the struggles of Native Americans, Asian Americans, and African Americans are placed in the context of the traditional white Progressive movement. Ford's moving assembly line, the emergence of a consumer culture, and the culmination of forces let loose by these entities in Los Angeles are all explored by Professor Miller. Brinkley paints a picture of America during the Depression and chronicles some of Roosevelt's programmatic and personal efforts to help the country through its worst economic crisis. World War II America is enveloped in total war, from mobilization on the home front to a scorching air war in Europe. The Fifties World War II is fought to its bitter end in the Pacific and the world lives with the legacy of its final moment: the atomic bomb.

Feminists gain a foothold in their fight for the right to vote, while farmers organize and the Populist Party appears on the American political landscape. Professor Miller introduces the miner as the quintessential laborer of the period -- working under grinding conditions, organizing into unions, and making a stand against the reigning money man of the day, J. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt is at FDR's side and, in many respects, ahead of him as the decade unfolds. Professor Miller's view of World War II is a personal essay on the morality of total war, and its effects on those who fought, died, and survived it, including members of his own family. Professor Miller continues the story as veterans return from the war and create new lives for themselves in the '50s. The Sixties Professor Scharff weaves the story of the Civil Rights movement with stories of the Vietnam War and Watergate to create a portrait of a decade. Contemporary History The entire team of historians joins Professor Miller in examining the last quarter of the twentieth century.